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Maintaining an 60 year old 1.6
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LowBlow
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PostPosted: 2011-08-18, 19:38    Post subject: Maintaining an 60 year old 1.6 Reply with quote

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Jeff Cairns wrote:
Hi Low Blow, the utaguchi is a filled resin. Probably epoxy of some sort. That shouldn't be an issue, though I would probably take the utaguchi face down a bit more(that means to uniformly remove a small amount of face material with either a fine flat file or fine sand paper on a flat block) until the top edge of the insert portion is relatively continuous and at the same level on both sides (the small lip on the upper right edge needs to be taken down.) I would also make sure that the bore side of the insert portion is smooth without any big gaps or ledges. These will definitely disturb the airflow.
It seems that the binding was put on the prevent further spread of the crack on the back right of the blowing end. As Perry says, it's certainly okay to remove the binding, but I would also suggest that you consider doing something more to prevent that crack from spreading. Maybe more aesthetically pleasing binding or a staple or pin.
Good luck with it.


Thank you Jeff,

the utaguchi is smooth and plain outside and inside. I think there is no need to sand it down. As far as i can see there is no bamboo behind the upper right edge. In the moment, i think, leaving the flute as is is the best choice. Making only some cosmetic "repairs". Removing the outer lacquer, lacquering the binding black and maybe relacquering the bore.
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LowBlow
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PostPosted: 2011-08-19, 17:03    Post subject: Maintaining an 60 year old 1.6 Reply with quote

some pics from inside the bore. should it be relacquered?











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Toby
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PostPosted: 2011-08-20, 14:06    Post subject: Maintaining an 60 year old 1.6 Reply with quote

Definitely replaced, you can see that the urushi is missing below the utaguchi, and apparently one side of the bamboo edge broke away and has been filled by the epoxy of the "insert". Be careful, that utaguchi is most probably not replaceable, as I guess it is completely bonded to the bamboo. If the flute sounds muffled it may well have to do with the jinashi bore profile. Leaving the scepta rough is generally a bad idea; one never can remove the thickening at the nodes completely, but the wider and smoother, the better. If this were my flute the first thing I would do is run a garibo down the bore at the nodal points to get rid of as much of the scepta as possible, but that would mean having to relacquer the bore.

Edit: aha! just saw the pix of the bore. I would definitely relacquer that, and before I did (personally speaking) I would get rid of the edges of the scepta with a garibo and then sand the whole bore as smooth as possible. Any bore roughness is going to decrease acoustic flow, and those sharp edges are murder--they create a lot of turbulence and limit the amount of sound that you can get out of the flute. How is the kan in terms of intonation--similar to the otsu?

In terms of tuning: you are relatively in luck that most of the notes are flat. If you, like John Neptune, would rather have the flute play in tune than have aesthetically-perfect holes, you can open the ones up that play flat. John uses a knife, and his holes are anything but round, and often up to 50% larger than normal, but but cutting material off the upper side of the hole, you effectively move them up and thus sharpen the notes. Undercutting the upper part of the holes will also help, but not enough to raise any of them more than about 10 cents. But you should do that after you redo the bore, as that might change the tuning somewhat.
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Kiku Day
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PostPosted: 2011-08-20, 15:08    Post subject: Maintaining an 60 year old 1.6 Reply with quote

Actually really cool to read the different suggestions! It is interesting how different we approach our instruments!
Cool thread! Okay
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LowBlow
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PostPosted: 2011-08-20, 20:25    Post subject: Maintaining an 60 year old 1.6 Reply with quote

Toby wrote:
If the flute sounds muffled it may well have to do with the jinashi bore profile.
smelling not sounding.

Toby wrote:
Leaving the scepta rough is generally a bad idea; one never can remove the thickening at the nodes completely, but the wider and smoother, the better. If this were my flute the first thing I would do is run a garibo down the bore at the nodal points to get rid of as much of the scepta as possible, but that would mean having to relacquer the bore.


I tried to (google) find out what a garibo is with no luck. Some sort of round rasp?

Toby wrote:
Edit: aha! just saw the pix of the bore. I would definitely relacquer that, and before I did (personally speaking) I would get rid of the edges of the scepta with a garibo and then sand the whole bore as smooth as possible. Any bore roughness is going to decrease acoustic flow, and those sharp edges are murder--they create a lot of turbulence and limit the amount of sound that you can get out of the flute. How is the kan in terms of intonation--similar to the otsu?


Will test and answer later.

Toby wrote:
In terms of tuning: you are relatively in luck that most of the notes are flat. If you, like John Neptune, would rather have the flute play in tune than have aesthetically-perfect holes, you can open the ones up that play flat. John uses a knife, and his holes are anything but round, and often up to 50% larger than normal, but but cutting material off the upper side of the hole, you effectively move them up and thus sharpen the notes. Undercutting the upper part of the holes will also help, but not enough to raise any of them more than about 10 cents. But you should do that after you redo the bore, as that might change the tuning somewhat.


I am not sure if i want to change pitches. The makers in the 50tes were surely able to make flutes with western pitch. But they didn't. Why? And how should these old flutes be treated? I will start another thread to discuss this point. If i need an 1.6 with modern western tuning i could byu one with no problem i think.
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Toby
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PostPosted: 2011-08-21, 14:04    Post subject: Maintaining an 60 year old 1.6 Reply with quote

Yes, a garibo is a small round or cylindrical rasp on the end of a long rod, used by makers to get rid of the scepta at the nodes and to make rough adjustments to the bore of a jiari flute. You could, if you wanted, probably secure a small half-round rasp to a stick. A rattail file is too fine and would take forever. I have jinashis with very smooth interiors, and some that look like yours. Both kinds play in their way, and so you might not want to change yours, unless you have a feeling that it is just too stuffy and lifeless, in which case taking out the edges of the scepta might help. It often affects the second register more than the first. It would be a good idea, though, to seal the bore--I do feel that a relacquer is in order, and while you don't need to remove all the old lacquer, you should definitely get rid of any pieces that are flaking or loose before redoing it.

Many older flutes (and some newer ones as well) have hole placements dictated by aesthetic rather than acoustic considerations--equal hole sizes and/or equidistant spacing from the nodes. And then too, in a jinashi flute with an irregular bore shape (as Kiku points out), the pitch is often not soley determined by the length. Many of these jinashi flutes are made to be solo instruments, enjoyed for the sound, not necessarily to be in tune or to be used in ensemble playing.
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