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3 wooden 1.8's
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Toby
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PostPosted: 2011-09-04, 16:47    Post subject: 3 wooden 1.8's Reply with quote

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Again, it is impossible to directly compare an inlaid utaguchi instrument with one without an inlay, since they are different instruments to begin with. The angle and especially the sharpness of the blowing edge are critical, since they are what the air reed that sets up the standing wave depend on. And yes, the smoothness is a significant factor as well.

Durability is a big plus in terms of opting for an inlaid utaguchi. Horn or bone or ivory (or acrylic) can take a sharper edge than the bamboo, and they also stand up much better to the enzymes in saliva that tend to dissolve the lignin of the bamboo. And of course inlays are designed to be replaceable without damaging the rest of the utaguchi. I have a beautiful old Chikuzen 1.7 that has had a number of progressively larger kinko utaguchi inlays put in, as use progressively dissolved the bamboo at the edges of the inlay. For that reason, I think Tozan inlays are actually the better design, since they cover more of the top edge.
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Ryuraku
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PostPosted: 2011-09-04, 18:52    Post subject: 3 wooden 1.8's Reply with quote

Sorry if this is furthering the tangent; but when you say 'smoothness' of the utaguchi, are you talking about macroscopic surfaces like Perry's photo, or more microscopic smoothness beyond the cellular texture of cut bamboo? Like when urushi fills the grain of the bamboo fibers. Just wondering.
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Toby
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PostPosted: 2011-09-05, 01:38    Post subject: 3 wooden 1.8's Reply with quote

Definitely macroscopic smoothness will affect things. Concert flute players are warned never to buff the blowing edge of the embouchure hole, as this can "ruin" a headjoint. An uneven edge will definitely be detrimental to the formation of the oscillations of the so-called "air reed". On the other hand, a less-well-defined edge might be preferable to some people who like a sound with less high harmonics and who want more resistance, or people who like a bit of turbulent roughness in the sound. And on a microscopic level, micropores in the bamboo will have at least some effect on the sound, creating extra acoustic losses. I'm not sure, but I'm guessing that the effect of that is small, since that area that the air contacts is also quite small. It is worth noting that 99% of the energy that a player puts into the flute is lost at the walls, with only 1% actually becoming sound, so within the body of the flute itself, even minor roughness becomes quite significant.
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Brian Tairaku Ritchie
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PostPosted: 2011-09-05, 01:47    Post subject: 3 wooden 1.8's Reply with quote

Toby wrote:
For that reason, I think Tozan inlays are actually the better design, since they cover more of the top edge.


They look better and seem to be more stable.
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Perry Yung
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PostPosted: 2011-09-06, 14:22    Post subject: 3 wooden 1.8's Reply with quote

Quote:

Durability is a big plus in terms of opting for an inlaid utaguchi. Horn or bone or ivory (or acrylic) can take a sharper edge than the bamboo, and they also stand up much better to the enzymes in saliva that tend to dissolve the lignin of the bamboo. And of course inlays are designed to be replaceable without damaging the rest of the utaguchi. I have a beautiful old Chikuzen 1.7 that has had a number of progressively larger kinko utaguchi inlays put in, as use progressively dissolved the bamboo at the edges of the inlay. For that reason, I think Tozan inlays are actually the better design, since they cover more of the top edge.




I'm working on this one this week. It needed both a new inlay and the edge built up.
.
Toby wrote:
Again, it is impossible to directly compare an inlaid utaguchi instrument with one without an inlay, since they are different instruments to begin with. The angle and especially the sharpness of the blowing edge are critical, since they are what the air reed that sets up the standing wave depend on. And yes, the smoothness is a significant factor as well.

I agree. But some people still like it rough Shocked ...Laughing
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LowBlow
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PostPosted: 2011-09-06, 20:04    Post subject: 3 wooden 1.8's Reply with quote

Little odd here:

Perry, the binding looks lacquered. What lacquer did you use?
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Perry Yung
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PostPosted: 2011-09-09, 16:51    Post subject: 3 wooden 1.8's Reply with quote

LowBlow wrote:
Little odd here:

Perry, the binding looks lacquered. What lacquer did you use?


Shuai urushi. It will have several more coats with fine sanding and rubbing in between until it is smooth.
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Fiona Dawes
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PostPosted: 2011-09-26, 03:57    Post subject: 3 wooden 1.8's Reply with quote

I would like to add, before moving on.

Recently I asked David Brown for a 2.0 hardwood flute as a companion to my Perry Yung Chikusing 2.0. Specifically to train my ear the better to play the bamboo with. I anticipated that the hardwood flute would be easier to play than the jinori/jinashi style bamboo.

I was suprised to discover my new 2.0 is difficult; feels like training at high altitudes. I needed to rethink the hardwood flute, this 2.0 is not a 'practice' flute for a beginner student, my embouchure gets a workout almost as if David had had a conversation with Riley, my teacher.

I am more than happy; I am getting more out of my Perry Yung 2.0. Riley is encouraging my studies of the folk tunes; by the way, frequently played on a 2.0.
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Brian Tairaku Ritchie
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PostPosted: 2011-09-26, 05:01    Post subject: 3 wooden 1.8's Reply with quote

Fiona are you going to be at the event on the weekend? If so bring the 2.0's I would like to test them.
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Fiona Dawes
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PostPosted: 2011-09-27, 03:07    Post subject: 3 wooden 1.8's Reply with quote

Hi Brian OMG

I will be going and I will have the flutes. Cheers.
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Perry Yung
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PostPosted: 2011-09-27, 19:14    Post subject: 3 wooden 1.8's Reply with quote

Hi Fiona, I'm so happy to hear that you are enjoying my 2.0.
A deep bow, Perry.
Fiona Dawes wrote:
I would like to add, before moving on.

Recently I asked David Brown for a 2.0 hardwood flute as a companion to my Perry Yung Chikusing 2.0. Specifically to train my ear the better to play the bamboo with. I anticipated that the hardwood flute would be easier to play than the jinori/jinashi style bamboo.

I was suprised to discover my new 2.0 is difficult; feels like training at high altitudes. I needed to rethink the hardwood flute, this 2.0 is not a 'practice' flute for a beginner student, my embouchure gets a workout almost as if David had had a conversation with Riley, my teacher.

I am more than happy; I am getting more out of my Perry Yung 2.0. Riley is encouraging my studies of the folk tunes; by the way, frequently played on a 2.0.

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Blog on shakuhachi, art and parenting - www.yungflutes.com
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Brian Tairaku Ritchie
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PostPosted: 2011-10-02, 23:37    Post subject: 3 wooden 1.8's Reply with quote

Perry Yung wrote:
Hi Fiona, I'm so happy to hear that you are enjoying my 2.0.
A deep bow, Perry.


Hi Perry, I met Fiona and the flute this weekend. I really enjoyed the sound of that flute...........buzzing on all notes.

Fiona is nice too!
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