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J. Danza
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PostPosted: 2012-11-03, 04:40    Post subject: Tell your story Reply with quote

PublicitéSupprimer les publicités ?
Hello friends... I am in the process of putting together a Shakuhachi website, and thought it would be really nice and interesting to have a page of personal stories about how people connected with the instrument, and why they fell in love with it (or is it love/hate Very Happy ) and also personal experiences of learning/playing, etc. I'm sure it would make for a very interesting read!
Feel free to send them directly to me at prayerdrum@yahoo.ca or, if they are short, post them right here. Please include name and country.
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Kiku Day
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PostPosted: 2012-11-03, 12:27    Post subject: Tell your story Reply with quote

And you are welcome to post the stories here as well! Smile
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Perry Yung
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PostPosted: 2012-11-03, 15:22    Post subject: Tell your story Reply with quote

J. Danza wrote:
Hello friends... I am in the process of putting together a Shakuhachi website, and thought it would be really nice and interesting to have a page of personal stories about how people connected with the instrument, and why they fell in love with it (or is it love/hate Very Happy ) and also personal experiences of learning/playing, etc. I'm sure it would make for a very interesting read!
Feel free to send them directly to me at prayerdrum@yahoo.ca or, if they are short, post them right here. Please include name and country.


Hey Pepe, That's a great idea! I would be honor to be on your new shakuhachi website. You can get my bio on my site.

In a nut shell, I first heard the shakuhachi in 1993 while I was performing as an actor on stage. Since then, the shakuhachi has permeated all nearly aspects of my life - artistic, intellectual, emotional and spiritual. One day, I'll totally be consumed Wink

Good luck! - Perry
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Kiku Day
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PostPosted: 2012-11-04, 14:45    Post subject: Tell your story Reply with quote

I'd like to tell my story.
I was just beginning the entrance examination to the Royal Academy of Music in Copenhagen on flute when an Austrian friend brought me an old LP with "music I had to hear". We found a turn table, listened to it. It was shakuhachi music. I immediately said: "I rather play that (shakuhachi) than this (flute).
A few month later I had jumped on a train to go on the transSiberian railroad.... via China and Tibet I came to Japan to search for shakuhachi.
Once in Japan, I just waited for the shakuhachi to come to me. It took a while but a friend brought me to Okuda. Had I now had the patience to wait but gone actively - I would probably never have met him.
Mr. Green
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J. Danza
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PostPosted: 2012-11-04, 19:10    Post subject: Tell your story Reply with quote

Thanks for sharing Kiku!
Mine started with a record too: Music for Zen Meditation, with Hozan Yamamoto jamming with Tony Scott. I was at the time (1978) living in Washington DC, playing electric guitar in a band that was one third John Cage, one third King Crimson, and one third Sex Pistols, and doing a lot of "substances" Cool . Just out of curiosity I bought this record and it had such impact on me that the moment it ended I called the Japanese Consulate and asked what the heck is Shakuhachi and how can I get a hold of one and a teacher!. They very kindly called me back soon enough with information that led me to a store in West Virginia (more than two hour drive), where I met a man who in many ways became a spiritual mentor also. He imported a Tom Deaver for me, and found me a teacher (the aforementioned Karl Signel). A year or so later I completely dropped everything I was doing and went into a year long retreat. I can truly talk about my life as: before and after Shakuhachi Very Happy
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m a doherty
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PostPosted: 2012-11-05, 19:27    Post subject: Tell your story Reply with quote

I first heard shakuhachi on a recording in college - its sound sat there in my ear for the next 14 years until it was through my sensitivity to silence, and to Zen practice, that brought me to its doorstep. Through a deep listening of music, through composition involving silence and space, I began to catch a glimpse of something with my ear that remained inexplicable, yet significantly present. I named it "silence"- and perhaps that is still the best word/concept for it. A friend, knowing my love of silence in music, recommended a book on the topic. In the first chapter I was reminded of shakuhachi, and the aesthetics that resonated with me ("ma"- they said). I figured that I should investigate this resonate silence for myself. My first years of playing occurred in the often quiet environment of a Rocky Mountain valley, where the synergy between the environment and the sound was palpable. It, consequently, quickly eclipsed all of my other music endeavors, and became the focus of many years of musical practice. Through the years since, shakuhachi has become an important aspect of my daily musical and non-musical practice. And the silence? That is another story entirely.
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Jam
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PostPosted: 2012-11-11, 00:31    Post subject: Tell your story Reply with quote

I was on my year abroad in Japan as a student, and when my parents came to visit we went up from Kitakyushu to Kyoto to do the tourist thing. We eventually ended up in Iga-Ueno as I love martial arts and the idea of a "ninja museum" sounded amazing. (Long story short, it was ok, a bit tacky). Anyway on the way in, near Basho's house, there was a flea market. I saw a bit of bamboo with holes in it and suddenly had this odd flashback to playing my keyboard at home about 5 years before, and remembering there was an instrument setting called "shakuhachi". I asked the seller if that was what it was, she smiled and said it was, and said I should try and play it. I huffed and I puffed, but nothing. I am a stubborn bastard so I decided I wouldn't be defeated, and bought it there and then.

When my family and I returned to my apartment in Fukuoka, I produced my spoils from the market, and my brother blew a note straight away. I was so annoyed! I went into university the following week and it transpired that the dean of my university was a highly regarded Tozan player, and also a lovely chap. He gave me free lessons every morning until I left Japan, and insisted that I performed Sakura and Kojo no Tsuki at our leaving party.

More than anything else, the language acquisition, the martial arts training or the various other experiences I had in Japan, finding that shakuhachi in that flea market has had the biggest effect on me. When I returned to the UK I was lucky enough to find an amazing teacher just 40 minutes drive from my front door, and now, 5 years later, it has been the main reason for my return trips to Japan, and I've been lucky to perform at the World Shakuhachi Festival and a few other performances here in the UK.
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J. Danza
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PostPosted: 2012-11-12, 02:14    Post subject: Tell your story Reply with quote

Beautiful stories! Thanks for sharing... and thanks for the emails too! I knew it would be juicy and touching. It gives the human dimension to the instrument and the amazing capacity that it has to literally change lives. Keep them coming!
Perry! you know you can count on being prominently featured in the upcoming website! (but where is my Seika!? Smile
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Perry Yung
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PostPosted: 2012-11-12, 14:57    Post subject: Tell your story Reply with quote

J. Danza wrote:
... and thanks for the emails too! I knew it would be juicy and touching. It gives the human dimension to the instrument and the amazing capacity that it has to literally change lives. Keep them coming!


Yes, especially in those who pick the up the flute everyday.

Quote:
(but where is my Seika!? Smile

Its' coming along but things are a little backed up due to Sandy. I'll be in touch. Okay
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Jeff Cairns
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PostPosted: 2012-11-14, 06:15    Post subject: Tell your story Reply with quote

Pepe, In my case, I would say that the shakuhachi came to me. I knew nothing of it prior to moving to Japan in 1986, but I was up against a legal predicament at the time in that I needed to change my visa status from visitor (which I renewed twice) to something that would allow me more time in Japan. One of my language students suggested that I try the shakuhachi since I played flute and saxophone. His father was studying and invited me to visit his sensei. As I said, I knew nothing of the instrument, but when I heard the sensei play, I was moved and thought that would be a justifiable way to stay in Japan. Legal issues dealt with and lessons well under way, my journey began in earnest. Little did I know that my purpose to stay in Japan would soon evolve into continuing my shakuhachi journey. It's now been 26 years, the teacher that moved me with his playing is still my teacher (Tsurugi Kodo), I have students of my own, I've become involved in bringing shakuhachi to many people around the world, I have the thrill of re-introducing this instrument to Japanese people and I haven't looked back.
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Jam
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PostPosted: 2012-11-14, 11:30    Post subject: Tell your story Reply with quote

Wonderful story Jeff. I really hope I'm lucky enough to be playing as long as you and some of the other players on the forum! 5 years sounds so pathetic in comparison!
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Jeff Cairns
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PostPosted: 2012-11-14, 14:14    Post subject: Tell your story Reply with quote

Jam, you're well on your way my friend.
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Rick Riekert
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PostPosted: 2012-11-14, 16:47    Post subject: Tell your story Reply with quote

Jam, Keats wrote poetry for only 5 years. I can understand wanting to flourish as long as Jeff, but there’s nothing pathetic, i.e. contemptibly inadequate, about playing a flute for 5 years. Believe me, you'll age fast enough.
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Jam
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PostPosted: 2012-11-14, 22:19    Post subject: Tell your story Reply with quote

Cheers guys!
Jam (James!)
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Jeff Cairns
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PostPosted: 2012-11-15, 04:01    Post subject: Tell your story Reply with quote

I'm starting to feel old...or should I say antique Okay
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